Game: Hungry Mice

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Production of Electricity by Mr A on 14 Feb 2010

Energy Flows Game

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Conservation of Energy by Mr A on 14 Feb 2010

Wasted Energy and Efficiency

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Conservation of Energy by Mr A on 24 Jan 2010

Energy Transformation

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Conservation of Energy by Mr A on 17 Jan 2010

Types of Energy

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Conservation of Energy by Mr A on 9 Jan 2010

Energy describes the amount of work that can be done by something.
There are many different types of energy…

  • Kinetic energy (KE) is the energy of movement: the faster something is moving the more KE it has.
  • Gravitational potential energy (GPE) is energy associated with position: the higher something is the more GPE it has.
  • Chemical energy is energy stored in chemical bonds, and may be released when chemical reactions take place. It includes energy stored in food, fuel, or in our bodies.
  • Elastic potential energy is the energy stored in a spring or a rubber band when it is stretched.
  • Electrical energy is the energy transferred by an electric current. Note that batteries store chemical energy, which is converted to electrical energy only when they are being used.
  • Thermal energy is the energy something has due to its temperature. It is actually the KE of its moving particles.
  • Nuclear energy is energy stored in atomic nuclei, released in nuclear fission and fusion.
  • Electromagnetic energy is the energy of a light source, or a source of any type of electromagnetic wave.
  • Sound energy is the energy of vibrating air particles, which we hear as sound. It is really a form of KE.

What forms of energy do each of the following things have?

Electrical Power

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Electrical Devices by Mr A on 9 Jan 2010

This slideshow starts with energy changes, particularly in electrical devices. Various devices are presented as discussion points.

The concept of Power is introduced, along with the equation P=E/t

Electrical Power Slideshow

Ice Cubes on a Conductor and an Insulator

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Thermal Energy by Mr A on 15 Nov 2009

2 Ice Cubes: one is placed on a cork mat (an insulator) and one on a metal surface (conductor). Because the metal is a conductor it is able to conduct thermal energy to the ice cube (and take it from the surroundings) much more quickly than the cork mat. The ice cube on the metal has completely melted while the cork mat has hardly made a dent.

This experiment also demonstrates that air (as with any gas) is a good insulator. If air was a good conductor, then the ice on the metal might have melted marginally faster; the effect would not be nearly so pronounced.

The video plays at 16 times normal speed; the ice cube on the metal took just over 8 minutes to melt.

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Convection Comic

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Thermal Energy by Mr A on 15 Nov 2009
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This is a comic without the pictures – it is intended that the pupils will draw the pictures in as we go along. This describes how a convection current happens, step-by-step.

Conduction

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Thermal Energy by Mr A on 12 Nov 2009

Liquid Nitrogen and a Balloon

Posted in AQA GCSE P1a, P1a: Thermal Energy by Mr A on 10 Nov 2009

This demonstrates Charles’ Law: gases expand when they are heated. The other way of looking at this is that the volume of a gas is reduced when it gets colder. This explains the driving force behind convection. When a gas (or liquid) gets hotter it expands, so it gets less dense and rises. Later, when it cools, its density increases again and it sinks.

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